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Brown Trout

Other Names: German Brown Trout, Brownie, Loch Leven Trout, Saibling

Scientific Name: Salmo trutta

Origin: Introduced

Adult Size: Normal size is 14-20 inches and 1-2 pounds. Browns occasionally reach 10 pounds.

Identification: Usually coloration is light brown or tawny with pronounced black spots on the back, sides and head. Spots are often surrounded with reddish halo, along with reddish spots on the sides. Color is highly variable and browns are occasionally confused with landlocked salmon.  The little adipose fin, just prior to the tail is usually solid black on salmon and molted on brown trout, as seen above.

Maine Fishing Guide Angling Tips:

Brown Trout will likely be the primary trout species of the future in waters across the central and southern areas of the State of Maine. "Browns" are resilient and can withstand adverse conditions that would compromise other members of the trout family. They have the ability to live in warmer waters,  rich in nutrients producing stronger and larger fish.

"Browns" can be taken with similar bait and fly patterns that one would use to catch salmon.  If you choose to pursue this fish while trolling,  start by using sewed on smelt or shiners. You can also use  streamers, simulating bait fish.  Rapala lures are a favorite choice for hardware. Fly fisherman will often take big browns on rivers using patterns that match the various hatches that are common for that body of water. Maine fishing guides will often keep a selection of caddis, terrestrials and blue wing olives, when they pursue local river browns. 

During the summer months, fly fishing for browns will allow the angler the opportunity to present various dry fly patterns to entice a postured fish. In the early morning hours, cast a cricket pattern close to the shoreline cover and twitch it to simulate a frantic prey. It will often produce a voracious bite. If you suspect a brown might be lying in a nice looking pool, cast across and upstream from your target at a forty-five degree angle and allow the fly to drift drag-free downstream.  If you turn a fish or simply get a rise that fails to end up in a "take", avoid casting over the same area for at lest five minutes. Playing out only your leader, and allowing the river draft to simply lift your leader and lightly dance your dry fly across the water, is another excellent method of enticing a rise from both salmon and browns.
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
Maine Fishing Guide - Brown trout descriptionMaine Fishing Guide - Brown trout description
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